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Handmade WORKING mini desktop ballista model!

$32.95
$69.99 Save $37.04
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Model is WORKING, shooting range is approx 2-3m (6-10ft), enough to arrange a siege of a small castle.

Size is comparable to three matchboxes (small). Model scaled to be used together with 28mm soldier figures.
The model is completely handmade from scratch, without any mass-production processes.

Design is replicating real weapon, with "ropes" and "old" wood. Model is recommended for 3+ year old children or grown-up children willing to do a desktop vs desktop battle.

Good for teaching basic physics principles.

Adult supervision is strongly recommended (the model really shoots and contains small parts). The model can be loaded with any type of small ammo, like M&Ms, small rocks, etc.
Roman warrior figures are not included.

Shelf life 10+ years.

Historical description

The early ballistae in Ancient Greece were developed from two weapons called oxybeles and gastraphetes.

With the invention of torsion spring bundle technology, the first ballistae were built. The advantage of this new technology was the fast relaxation time of this system. Thus it was possible to shoot lighter projectiles with higher velocities over a longer distance. By contrast, the comparatively slow relaxation time of a tension machine such as the oxybeles meant that much less energy could be transferred to light projectiles, limiting the effective range of the weapon.

The earliest form of the ballista is thought to have been developed for Dionysius of Syracuse, c. 400 BC.

After the absorption of the Ancient Greek city-states into the Roman Republic in 146 BC, the highly advanced Greek technology began to spread across many areas of Roman influence. This included the great military machine advances the Greeks had made (most notably by Dionysus of Syracuse), as well as all the scientific, mathematical, political, and artistic developments.

The Romans 'inherited' the torsion-powered ballista, which had by now spread to several cities around the Mediterranean, all of which became Roman spoils of war, including one from Pergamum, which was depicted among a pile of trophy weapons in relief on a balustrade.

The torsion ballista, developed by Alexander, was a far more complicated weapon than its predecessor and the Romans developed it even further, especially into much smaller versions, that could be easily carried.

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